India

Overview and context

Laws
5
Policies
12
Litigation cases
9
Climate targets
19

Region
South Asia
% Global Emissions
6.81 %
Global Climate Risk Index
38.67
Income group (World Bank)
Lower middle income
Main political groups
G77; G20
Federative/Unitary
Federative 29 states, 7 Union Territories, including a National Capital Territory
Region
South Asia
Income group (World Bank)
Lower middle income
% Global Emissions
6.81 %
Main political groups
G77; G20
Global Climate Risk Index
38.67
Federative/Unitary
Federative 29 states, 7 Union Territories, including a National Capital Territory

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Nationally Determined Contribution (UNFCCC website)
Legislative process
The Indian parliament is a bicameral legislature composed of a Lower House (the House of the People), and an Upper House (the Council of States). The legislature passes laws – also called “acts” – on constitutionally-specified matters, such as central government finances and constitutional amendments. The two houses have the same powers, but the Council of States’ power in the legislative process is subordinate

The Indian parliament is a bicameral legislature composed of a Lower House (the House of the People), and an Upper House (the Council of States).

The legislature passes laws – also called “acts” – on constitutionally-specified matters, such as central government finances and constitutional amendments. The two houses have the same powers, but the Council of States’ power in the legislative process is subordinate to the House of the People. All legislative proposals have to be brought in the form of Bills before Parliament. A Bill as a draft statute becomes law after it has received the approval of both Houses of Parliament and the assent of the President.

There are 29 States and seven Union territories in the country (In June 2014, Telangana became the 29th state, consisting of the 10 north-western districts of Andhra Pradesh). The system of government in states closely resembles that of the Union territories. Each State Government has the freedom to draft its own laws state subjects. Laws passed by the national Parliament and other pre-existing central laws on subjects classified as central subjects are binding on all citizens.

from the Grantham Research Institute
from the Grantham Research Institute
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