Mexico

Overview and context

Laws
10
Policies
4
Litigation cases
1
Climate targets
9

Region
Latin America & Caribbean
% Global Emissions
1.45 %
Global Climate Risk Index
61.83
Income group (World Bank)
Upper middle income
Main political groups
G20; OECD; EIG
Federative/Unitary
Federative 32 federal entities, which are 31 states and its capital Mexico City
Region
Latin America & Caribbean
Income group (World Bank)
Upper middle income
% Global Emissions
1.45 %
Main political groups
G20; OECD; EIG
Global Climate Risk Index
61.83
Federative/Unitary
Federative 32 federal entities, which are 31 states and its capital Mexico City

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The Climate Change Laws of the World map helps understand our database information in context by showing climate laws, policies, and litigation cases in relation to key climate-related indicators.
Nationally Determined Contribution (UNFCCC website)
Legislative process

The United Mexican States (Mexico) has a bicameral legislature (Congress) made up of the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate. The Lower Chamber is formed by 300 members elected in a system of electoral districts, and 200 members elected through a system of regional lists for a three-year term. The Senate has 128 senators, two of whom are elected and one assigned for each of the 3

The United Mexican States (Mexico) has a bicameral legislature (Congress) made up of the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate. The Lower Chamber is formed by 300 members elected in a system of electoral districts, and 200 members elected through a system of regional lists for a three-year term. The Senate has 128 senators, two of whom are elected and one assigned for each of the 31 states and the Federal District for a six-year term. The last Senate election was held in 2012 and the last Chamber of Deputies election in June 2015 (next election for both Chambers is scheduled for 2018).

The Constitution establishes that only the President and members of the Congress can introduce a bill in Congress. In practice, most bills are initiated by the executive branch. With a few exceptions, the legislative process requires the discussion and approval of a draft bill by both the Senate and the Chamber of Deputies. The Senate addresses all matters concerning foreign policy, approves international agree¬ments and confirms presidential appointments. The Chamber of Deputies addresses all matters pertaining to the government’s budget and public expendi¬tures.

If passed in both Chambers, a bill becomes law once it has received presidential approval and been published in the official gazette. If not sanctioned, the bill is sent back to one of the chambers with suggested amendments, re-launching the legislative process for the adoption of that law.


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